Posts Tagged ‘Meters’

Like the previous reviews of light meters, I am restricting this review to affordable temperature meters I have direct experience with in actual project work. Anyone who works with or applied LED technology should consider investing in some form of reliable temperature meter to test results of either products in development, or product performance in the field. The Achille’s Heel of solid-state technology is its susceptibility to failure and degradation from operating at high temperatures. This extends beyond the LED into the driver and power supply components, which are often placed under stress from fixture packaging or location near heat sources. The first issue that a manufacturer will raise when facing a field failure, will be the temperature the fixtures were operated in, either caused by the product design, or the physical application, heat kills LED products. That said, just like photometric test equipment, laboratories and large engineering departments will spend many thousands of dollars on test gear, and calibration services. That’s great if that is the focus of your business. For the rest of us, especially those in small business, the costs of test equipment must be weighed against the myriad of other tools and expenses. So, the question becomes, can one keep the costs low and still get reliable results. The following is an attempt to provide some insight into this, and show solutions I have found to be reliable after several years of using various products with varying degrees of satisfaction. (more…)

This is going to be a quick one. First of all, no matter what other meters one might own, the basic illuminance meter, with its readout in Lux or Fc remains an essential. You pull it out, press a button, get a number. The issue is with the latest generation of LED fixtures and retrofit lamps. They present a somewhat skewed spectral balance that can cause issues with older meters. For example, my trusty old (very very old) Minolta Color Meter II shows all LED sources as being roughly 200 CCT cooler than they actually are, sometimes, sometimes not. My other old trusty bag filler is a Minolta T-1H, which is great under daylight and tungsten sources, but not so good under LEDs, where  readings are off about 12% most of the time, and when exposed to LEDs with any flicker in them – the meter has a hard time finding a reading to settle on. I also have a Testo 540 digital ligth meter, which is an excellent in-the-pocket device, as it is very slim and includes a cover for the light sensor. At a cost of under $140, they are hard to beat for a simple tag-along meter for general illuminance measurement. (more…)