Posts Tagged ‘Cree LR6’

In my previous entries regarding the Cree LR6, I’ve noted the good and bad sides of the product in some detail. I’ve noted my dissatisfaction with the brightness of the diffuser, which has caused me to first apply plastic trim rings to add a little cutoff, then later, to simply not turn them on. Dimming performance over the years has been disappointing as well. No dimmer I have found has dimmed them satisfactorily, most cause them to flicker. The latest from Lutron, designed specifically for LED/CFL sources, did not fix the issues, so I simply gave up. Rather than remove these expensive retrofits ($65.00+ each), I chose to do what many of us do when caught in a  quandary – stopped using them at all. Estimating these were not used more than an average of 1 hour a day for the last 4 years, total operating time is less than 1,500 hours. I’ll give them 2,000hrs, assuming that when they were first put in place, I used them more than I did as we grew tired of their glare and flickering under dimmer control. (more…)

lr6

The LR6 downlight is the best performing LED downlight product on the market today, new or old construction.

This is the Cree LR6 downlight retrofit. Producing a white light color of 2700k (Incandescent white – also available in 3500k neutral white) at 92CRI, these inserts produce 650 lumens, consuming only 12 watts. This is an unprecedented 54 Lumens per Watt, exceeding even the best Compact Fluorescent downlight products on the market today. The product is expected to last 50,000 hours to 70% of its full light output.

The product inserts into virtually any 6″ recessed downlight housing. Installation takes less than 10 minutes.

In the test application of this product, 4 fixtures were installed in standard Halo H7 housings, with addition of optional brushed nickle trims to compliment the stainless steel trim, which snaps easily in place after the retrofit body is installed.

Comparing the illuminance calculated using the company provided photometric data and actual measurements in the applied space were within 7% of one another, with the actual application being slightly better than predicted. After 9 months, there has been no measurable light loss. (more…)