Archive for the ‘Reviewed – Exemplary’ Category

In 2010 we purchased our first 3D printer, a Dimension bst1200es from Stratasys. My intent from the off was to use it for making functional parts, over pure prototype uses. This meant that the traditional SLA process, which is very costly to own and operate, was not a consideration. I wanted parts made of a material that could stand being put into actual finished goods. This led to FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling). The material it prints is ABS plus, which is an excellent plastic for internal bits as well as structural components, within reason. I wrote a bit on this, with a video link during Week Thirteen of the 52 in 52 project that year. Since then, I have printed literally thousands of parts on this machine. I have guns fitted with stocks and stock parts made from the material, I have a motorcycle loaded with it in various uses, from fender supports to electrical housings. I’ve used it to make trade show light fixtures, sculptures, and holding fixtures for welding and vises on the CNC machining center (another 3D device). For more thoughts on 3D Printing, you can download a copy of  The Real 3D’s of 3D Printing, a presentation I gave on the topic to a 3D printing and maker group.

Recently, in the interest of lowering printed part cost and expand capacity, I added a second 3D printer. (more…)

When it came to setting up a lab with a proper precision meter for collecting and evaluating color (CCT) and color quality (CRI), as well as measuring transmission, luminance, radiance, irradiance, and illuminance of light sources and fixtures, I chose the Orb Optronix SP-100. This was done in partnership with a customer, for whom we set up a complete lab with goniometer we built for the customer, for testing their ongoing products as part of a design services agreement. In time as the customer grew in their own capacity, the entire rig, along with the data processing protocol we developed over several years, was transferred to the customers own facility, where staff was trained to complete their own tests in-house, where this is still in use today. (more…)

08285I have a fondness for the halogen lamp. From the little 20W bi-pin 12V burners to the 500W double ended monsters, the combination of light quality, simplicity, toughness, light density and versatility filled a special place in the hearts of lighting designers for decades. While there were also  larger iterations of the technology reaching 20,000W, even the most halogen crazed found them to be a bit over the top, setting them aside for special applications. In my own experience, the 20W through 75W 12V burners, 15W through 65W MR16, 35 through 50W PAR36 and 75W through 250W mini-can line voltage lamps hit the spot for a wide range of focused and unfocused lighting product designs. For my personal portable lamp works, the low voltage burners, MR16 and the PAR36 lamps were my favorites. I could create live-structures (where the fixture acted as conductor) using remote 12V power supplies, allowing sculptures to be simple to the extreme.

This simple bridge design was created using building and armature wire, a PAR36 halogen lamp, and a ball bearing counter weight.

This simple bridge design was created using building and armature wire, a PAR36 halogen lamp, and a ball bearing counter weight.

When LEDs arrived on the scene in the late 1990’s, I caught a glimmer of what was to come. By the year 2002, it was obvious that solid-state would be delivering something new, and that the properties of the source technology shared a great deal with the halogen lamp from a lighting perspective, with a huge advantage – far less heat, much tougher and resistant to impact, and very long lived. The only issue was, color quality was initially poor, consistency from LED to LED was awful, and light output per individual LED device was pathetic. This required designs utilize a number of LEDs mounted to circuit boards, wired to drivers that were clumsy at best. The complexity of LEDs in the earlier stages were compounded by the lack of available components, which meant one-off application of the technology was out of reach for anyone not up for custom electronics design. (more…)

lr6

The LR6 downlight is the best performing LED downlight product on the market today, new or old construction.

This is the Cree LR6 downlight retrofit. Producing a white light color of 2700k (Incandescent white – also available in 3500k neutral white) at 92CRI, these inserts produce 650 lumens, consuming only 12 watts. This is an unprecedented 54 Lumens per Watt, exceeding even the best Compact Fluorescent downlight products on the market today. The product is expected to last 50,000 hours to 70% of its full light output.

The product inserts into virtually any 6″ recessed downlight housing. Installation takes less than 10 minutes.

In the test application of this product, 4 fixtures were installed in standard Halo H7 housings, with addition of optional brushed nickle trims to compliment the stainless steel trim, which snaps easily in place after the retrofit body is installed.

Comparing the illuminance calculated using the company provided photometric data and actual measurements in the applied space were within 7% of one another, with the actual application being slightly better than predicted. After 9 months, there has been no measurable light loss. (more…)