Archive for the ‘Facilities’ Category

Additive manufacturing – AKA 3D Printing – comes in several forms that produce various degrees of detail and part integrity. For most of us, the go-to process is FDM, which generates strong plastic parts at a reasonable cost, using a wide range of polymers to suit many needs.

An early part created using FDM Printing, with minimal post-print processing or smoothing.

FDM – Fused Deposition Modeling, also known and MLE (Material Layer Extrusion) – is a process in which a filament of plastic is heated and extruded, tracing the part and its interior, layer by layer. This is the most common process for making strong end-use parts, made from a wide range of materials. FDM printing is also very cost effective, using affordable equipment. Can produce crude optical diffusers, but unsuited to optical forms.

For art produced by the author at Lumenique, we employ a Stratasys F370 Professional grade high performance FDM 3D printer that can print a wide range of plastics. The F370 is a highly reliable printer, that can generate parts that take many days to produce, without failures or quality issues. There are many lower cost machines on the market, but they are not capable of reliably printing large, high quality parts runs without failing. We regularly print jobs that take more than 60 hours, that consume 75 cubic inches of material. We invest in the equipment needed to support this. Our previous Stratasys printer generated over 900 print jobs, with just 2 print failures in the 9 years we had it in operation.

The Stratasys F370 Printer is an industry leading, high reliability, commercial/industrial grade machine with 4 material bays and a heated build environment.
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There is a great deal of marketing noise professing the use of CCT white light tuning to enhance circadian function in work environments. The real question is whether this approach actually has any real-world effect on human response to light in the spaces it is being applied to.

Theoretically, the proposition is that by changing the CCT of light, one can affect circadian reaction – specifically increase or decrease melatonin suppression. The proponents of CCT tuning profess that, with no consideration of illuminance levels, cooler CCT’s will produce greater melatonin suppression, resulting in a more wakeful state, while warmer CCT’s will produce significantly less melatonin suppression, creating a more restful state that does not disrupt sleep cycles. The assumption is that illuminance levels required for proper task performance can be maintained, relying solely on a CCT change alone to impart the desired “Human Centric” benefit.

To test this, I created a test box that houses 5 different high CRI LEDs, with a dimmer. The CCT’s I chose are the popular 2700, 3000, 3500, 4000, and 5000K. All had >88CRI and >90Rf/94Rg (using TM30). The first test was to set illuminance at 50Fc, and measure the difference in Circadian Stimulus (RPI/LRC method), and Melanopic Lux (Well Buildings Standard). (more…)

Virtual Facilities Tour

Posted: December 15, 2015 in Facilities
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After  a month of moving and settling in, we are now up and running in our new facilities. We’ve got room to move around, space to lay out projects, and our equipment is now properly set up, powered, and fully operational. This affords us to produce the level of quality we strive for, and opens doors for expanding capabilities. This is just the beginning of my personal effort to explore delivery of product and service of distinctive character and value. It also affords me the space to experiment, play, and create unrestrained by the cramped quarters we were operating out of in the home-based facilities. Believe it or not, most everything you see here in the tour was crammed into our home until the first week of November. It’s a work in process. As we add capabilities, as well as do a little lighting remodeling, I’ll post updates. Stop in and visit! (more…)

The recent press release announcing Philips, Cisco, et al,  joint venturing to deploy and build Power over Ethernet (PoE) networks in lighting is going to fuel this discussion and create a stir, without a doubt. In the press release, all the current hot buttons were pressed with vigor, from App controlled lighting using smart phones to ties to the Internet of Things (IoT). The picture painted by this release, presentations on this topic, and other articles floating about, indicate a future where lighting breaks its bonds of wiring to be free to serve us all in magical, never before realized new ways, using less energy through magic DC power, finally severing us from the drag of AC power. It’s certainly got folks talking.

At the recent LED Specifier Summit in Chicago, I was asked by no less than 8 people what I thought about PoE, and whether it was going to be the next big disruptive innovation to strike lighting. Concurrent to this were phone discussions with technology providers and fixture manufacturers, asking similar questions. It was hard not to think that something was going on, as everyone seems to be all quivery about it. The problem is… I am not so sure what all the fuss is about, and whether anyone is really thinking this through. I like the concept of a distributed network style, low voltage DC lighting infrastructure. It solves fixture design issue, and presents intriguing possibilities for integrating controls, lighting and the IT universes together in ways our current system of isolation-in-high-voltage simply cannot easily address.

Advantages Impossible to Ignore (more…)

Lumenique started life as an artistic outlet for me as a lighting design consultant back in the late 1980’s. It has evolved and been transformed several times, with small offerings of products from stress bars for BMW cars, to lighting TCO calculator spreadsheets. In 2006, Lumenique become my full time business and home focusing exclusively on solid-state lighting. When I mean home, I mean that literally. Since then, it has grown to absorb so much space, the line between business and living spaces have become muddled. Further, we’ve run out of space for works in process. This has created a significant bottleneck in operations, where we have been limited to just one project at a time, simply because there was no room to accommodate more. This is a bit ridiculous, as that means not only have we extended the time to complete projects, equipment we have accumulated to serve customers often sits idle, while other projects are cleared to make room. Further, space limitations kept us from pursuing projects that were of any scale larger than a few units at a time, or of small scale, as we had no space to assemble, pack and complete the work beyond that scale.

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